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All Posts Tagged: High risk Pregnancy Care hospital

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What is Uterine Fibroid Utilization?

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What is Uterine Fibroid Utilization?

Uterine fibroid embolization (UFE) is a minimally invasive treatment for fibroid tumors of the uterus. The procedure is also sometimes referred to as Uterine Artery Embolization (UAE) also.

Why it’s done

Uterine fibroids can cause severe symptoms in some women, including heavy menstrual bleeding, pelvic pain and swelling of the abdomen. Uterine artery embolization destroys fibroid tissue and eases these symptoms. And it provides an alternative to surgery to remove fibroids (myomectomy).

You might choose uterine artery embolization if you’re premenopausal and:

  • You have severe pain or heavy bleeding from uterine fibroids
  • You want to avoid surgery, or surgery is too risky for you
  • You want to keep your uterus
  • Optimizing a future pregnancy isn’t your chief concern

Risks

Uterine artery embolization is generally safe. Ask your doctor about these possible problems.

A risk for any anesthesia is having a bad reaction to the anesthetic that is used.

The risks for any invasive procedure are:

  • Bleeding
  • Infection
  • Bruising

The risks of uterine artery embolization are:

  • Injury to an artery or to the uterus
  • Complications with a future pregnancy. Some of these are intrauterine growth restriction (a condition that causes the baby to grow more slowly than usual in the uterus), preterm delivery (the baby is born early), bleeding after delivery, problems with the placenta, and miscarriage.
  • Pregnancy is not recommended after this procedure
  • Early menopause

Before the Procedure

Always tell your doctor or nurse:

  • If you could be pregnant
  • What drugs you are taking, even drugs, supplements, or herbs you bought without a prescription

Before your UAE:

You may be asked to stop taking aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), warfarin (Coumadin), and any other drugs that make it hard for your blood to clot.

Ask your doctor which drugs you should still take on the day of your surgery.

If you smoke, try to stop. Ask your doctor or nurse for help.

On the day of your UAE:

  • You will usually be asked not to drink or eat anything for 6 to 8 hours before this procedure.
  • Take the drugs your doctor told you to take with a small sip of water.
  • Your doctor or nurse will tell you when to arrive at the hospital.
  • After Uterine Artery Embolization

After the Procedure

  • Women usually stay in the hospital overnight after UAE. Some women are able to go home a few hours after treatment, but this is less common.
  • You will receive pain medicine. You will be asked to lie flat for 4 to 6 hours after the procedure.
  • Pelvic cramps are common for the first 24 hours after the procedure. They may last for 2 weeks. Cramps may be severe and may last more than 6 hours at a time.
  • The treated fibroid tissue may pass through your vagina.
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What is Pelvic Inflammatory Disease?

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Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection of the female reproductive organs. It most often occurs when sexually transmitted bacteria spread from your vagina to your uterus, fallopian tubes or ovaries.

The signs and symptoms of pelvic inflammatory disease can be subtle or mild. Some women don’t experience any signs or symptoms. As a result, you might not realize you have it until you have trouble getting pregnant or you develop chronic pelvic pain.

Causes of pelvic inflammatory disease

Many types of bacteria can cause PID, but gonorrhea or chlamydia infections are the most common. These bacteria are usually acquired during unprotected sex.

Less commonly, bacteria can enter your reproductive tract anytime the normal barrier created by the cervix is disturbed. This can happen during menstruation and after childbirth, miscarriage or abortion. Rarely, bacteria can also enter the reproductive tract during the insertion of an intrauterine device (IUD) — a form of long-term birth control — or any medical procedure that involves inserting instruments into the uterus.

Symptoms of pelvic inflammatory disease

Some women with pelvic inflammatory disease don’t have symptoms. For the women who do have symptoms, these can include:

  • pain in the lower abdomen (the most common symptom)
  • pain in the upper abdomen
  • fever
  • painful sex
  • painful urination
  • irregular bleeding
  • increased or foul-smelling vaginal discharge
  • tiredness

Pelvic inflammatory disease can cause mild or moderate pain. However, some women have severe pain and symptoms, such as:

  • sharp pain in the abdomen
  • vomiting
  • fainting
  • a high fever (greater than 101°F)

If you have severe symptoms, call your doctor immediately or go to the emergency room. The infection may have spread to your bloodstream or other parts of your body. This can be life-threatening.

When to see a doctor

See your doctor or seek urgent medical care if you experience:

  • Severe pain low in your abdomen
  • Nausea and vomiting, with an inability to keep anything down
  • Fever, with a temperature higher than 101 F (38.3 C)
  • Foul vaginal discharge

If you have signs and symptoms of PID that aren’t severe, still see your doctor as soon as possible. Vaginal discharge with an odor, painful urination or bleeding between menstrual cycles can also be symptoms of a sexually transmitted infection (STI).

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Why Anemia is Common in Pregnancy?

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Every pregnancy is different. But there are a few things most women can expect. An increased risk for anemia is one of them.

When you’re pregnant, you may develop anemia. When you have anemia, your blood doesn’t have enough healthy red blood cells to carry oxygen to your tissues and to your baby.

During pregnancy, your body produces more blood to support the growth of your baby. If you’re not getting enough iron or certain other nutrients, your body might not be able to produce the amount of red blood cells it needs to make this additional blood.

It’s normal to have mild anemia when you are pregnant. But you may have more severe anemia from low iron or vitamin levels or from other reasons.

Anemia can leave you feeling tired and weak. If it is severe but goes untreated, it can increase your risk of serious complications like preterm delivery.

Symptoms of anemia during pregnancy         

Early on, you may mistake symptoms of anemia for normal symptoms of pregnancy; some pregnant women are completely unaware they’re anemic until it’s revealed in a blood test. But as the condition progresses, you may experience:

  • Excessive tiredness
  • Weakness
  • Headaches
  • Dizziness
  • Shortness of breath
  • A rapid or irregular heartbeat
  • Numbness or a cold feeling in your hands and feet
  • A low body temperature
  • Pale skin
  • Chest pain
  • Irritability (due specifically to a B12 deficiency)

If you’re experiencing any of these symptoms and are concerned it might be anemia, be sure to let your doctor know.

Types of Anemia during Pregnancy

Several types of anemia can develop during pregnancy. These include:

  • Iron-deficiency anemia
  • Folate-deficiency anemia
  • Vitamin B12 deficiency

Here’s why these types of anemia may develop:

Iron-deficiency anemia. This type of anemia occurs when the body doesn’t have enough iron to produce adequate amounts of hemoglobin. That’s a protein in red blood cells. It carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body.

In iron-deficiency anemia, the blood cannot carry enough oxygen to tissues throughout the body.

Iron deficiency is the most common cause of anemia in pregnancy.

Folate-deficiency anemia. Folate is the vitamin found naturally in certain foods like green leafy vegetables A type of B vitamin, the body needs folate to produce new cells, including healthy red blood cells.

Vitamin B12 deficiency. The body needs vitamin B12 to form healthy red blood cells. When a pregnant woman doesn’t get enough vitamin B12 from their diet, their body can’t produce enough healthy red blood cells. Women who don’t eat meat, poultry, dairy products, and eggs have a greater risk of developing vitamin B12 deficiency, which may contribute to birth defects, such as neural tube abnormalities, and could lead to preterm labor.

How to prevent anemia when you’re expecting

While not all cases of anemia are preventable, getting enough iron in your diet goes a long way in helping you to avoid the condition. Before you’re pregnant, that means consuming 18 mg of iron per day; once you do conceive you should aim for 27 mg. While prenatal vitamin covers your bases — along with your requirements for other important nutrients like folic acid and vitamin B12 — you should also try to eat a variety of healthy foods that are high in iron. These include (note all measurements are approximate):

  1. Liver (5 mg in 3 oz of beef liver)
  2. Beans and legumes (4 mg in 1/2 cup of white beans; 3 mg in 1/2 cup of lentils)
  3. Green leafy vegetables (6 mg in 1 cup cooked spinach)
  4. Seeds and nuts (2 mg in 1 oz or 18 cashews)
  5. Dark chocolate (7 mg in 3 oz)
  6. Iron-fortified cereal (18 per serving)
  7. Baked potato (2 mg for a medium spud)

Cooking in cast iron cookware may also help give your iron intake a little boost, since foods absorb some of the iron from the pan. Also note that animal-based (meat) iron is absorbed by the body better than plant-based iron.

Though anemia during pregnancy can be scary, rest assured it’s also easily diagnosed and treated.

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miscarriage

What is a miscarriage?

miscarriage

A miscarriage is the loss of a baby before the 20th week of pregnancy. The medical term for a miscarriage is spontaneous abortion. But it isn’t an abortion in the common meaning of the term.

As many as 50% of all pregnancies end in miscarriage — most often before a woman misses a menstrual period or even knows she’s pregnant. About 15%-25% of recognized pregnancies will end in a miscarriage.

More than 80% of miscarriages happen within the first 3 months of pregnancy. Miscarriages are less likely to happen after 20 weeks. When they do, doctors call them late miscarriages.

Miscarriage Symptoms

Symptoms of a miscarriage include:

  • Bleeding that goes from light to heavy
  • Severe cramps
  • Belly pain
  • Weakness
  • Worsening or severe back pain
  • Fever with any of the symptoms listed above
  • Weight loss
  • White-pink mucus
  • Contractions
  • Tissue that looks like blood clots passing from your vagina
  • Fewer signs of pregnancy

If you have these symptoms listed above, contact your doctor right away. They’ll tell you whether to come to the office or go to the emergency room.

Miscarriage Causes and Risk Factors

Most miscarriages happen when the unborn baby has fatal genetic problems. Usually, these problems are not related to the mother.

Other problems that can increase the risk of miscarriage include:

  • Infection
  • Medical conditions in the mother, such as diabetes or thyroid disease
  • Hormone problems
  • Immune system responses
  • Physical problems in the mother
  • Uterine abnormalities
  • Smoking
  • Drinking alcohol
  • Using street drugs
  • Exposure to radiation or toxic substances

A woman has a higher risk of miscarriage if she:

  • Is over age 35
  • Has certain diseases, such as diabetes or thyroid problems
  • Has had three or more miscarriages

Miscarriage types

There are many different types of miscarriage. Depending on your symptoms and the stage of your pregnancy, your doctor will diagnose your condition as one of the following:

  • Complete miscarriage: All pregnancy tissues have been expelled from your body.
  • Incomplete miscarriage: You’ve passed some tissue or placental material, but some still remains in your body.
  • Missed miscarriage: The embryo dies without your knowledge, and you don’t deliver it.
  • Threatened miscarriage: Bleeding and cramps point to a possible upcoming miscarriage.
  • Inevitable miscarriage: The presence of bleeding, cramping, and cervical dilation indicates that a miscarriage is inevitable.
  • Septic miscarriage: An infection has occurred within your uterus.

How to Prevent Miscarriage

Not all miscarriages can be prevented. However, you can take steps to help maintain a healthy pregnancy. Here are a few recommendations:

  • Get regular prenatal care throughout your pregnancy.
  • Avoid alcohol, drugs, and smoking while pregnant.
  • Maintain a healthy weight before and during pregnancy.
  • Avoid infections. Wash your hands thoroughly, and stay away from people who are already sick.
  • Limit the amount of caffeine to no more than 200 milligrams per day.
  • Take prenatal vitamins to help ensure that you and your developing fetus get enough nutrients.
  • Eat a healthy, well-balanced diet with lots of fruits and vegetables.

Remember that having a miscarriage doesn’t mean you won’t conceive again in the future. Most women who miscarry have healthy pregnancies later.

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