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Bad Cholesterol Vs Good Cholesterol

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What is Cholesterol?

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that’s found in all the cells in your body. Your liver makes cholesterol, and it is also in some foods, such as meat and dairy products. Your body needs some cholesterol to work properly. But if you have too much cholesterol in your blood, you have a higher risk of coronary artery disease.

Cholesterol travels through the blood on proteins called “lipoproteins.” Two types of lipoproteins carry cholesterol throughout the body:

LDL (low-density lipoprotein), sometimes called “bad” cholesterol, makes up most of your body’s cholesterol. High levels of LDL cholesterol raise your risk for heart disease and stroke.

HDL (high-density lipoprotein), or “good” cholesterol, absorbs cholesterol and carries it back to the liver. The liver then flushes it from the body. High levels of HDL cholesterol can lower your risk for heart disease and stroke.

When your body has too much LDL cholesterol, the LDL cholesterol can build up on the walls of your blood vessels. This buildup is called “plaque.” As your blood vessels build up plaque over time, the insides of the vessels narrow. This narrowing blocks blood flow to and from your heart and other organs. When blood flow to the heart is blocked, it can cause angina (chest pain) or a heart attack.

Causes of high cholesterol

Lifestyle factors that may cause high cholesterol are:

  • obesity
  • a diet high in red meat, full-fat dairy products, saturated fats, trans fats, and processed foods
  • a large waist circumference (over 40 inches for men or over 35 inches for women)
  • lack of regular exercise

How to treat high cholesterol

To treat high cholesterol, doctors often recommend these lifestyle changes:

  • stopping smoking
  • eating a healthy diet
  • exercising regularly
  • reducing stress

Sometimes lifestyle changes aren’t enough, especially if you have FH. You may need one or more medications such as:

  • statins to help your liver get rid of cholesterol
  • bile-acid-binding medications to help your body use extra cholesterol to produce bile
  • cholesterol absorption inhibitors to prevent your small intestines from absorbing cholesterol and releasing it into your bloodstream
  • injectable medications that cause your liver to absorb more LDL cholesterol

Medications and supplements to reduce triglyceride levels may also be used such as niacin (Niacor), omega-3 fatty acids, and fibrates.

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What are the Four Stages of pneumonia ?

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Pneumonia is an infection of the lungs that causes cough, fever, and trouble breathing. It can cause serious illness in young children, people over age 65, and people with other health problems. Pneumonia may affect one or both lungs.

What are the stages of pneumonia?

Pneumonia can be classified or characterized in different ways. Health care professionals often refer to pneumonia based upon the way that the infection is acquired, such as community-acquired pneumonia or hospital-acquired pneumonia.

  • Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), as the name implies, is a respiratory infection of the lung that develops outside of the hospital or health care environment. It is more common than hospital-acquired pneumonia. CAP is most common in winter and affects about 4 million people in a year
  • Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) is acquired when an individual is already hospitalized for another condition. HAP is generally more serious because it develops in ill patients already hospitalized or under medical care for another condition. Being on a ventilator for respiratory support increases the risk of acquiring HAP. Health care-associated pneumonia is acquired from other health care settings, like kidney dialysis centers, outpatient clinics, or nursing homes.

Other classification systems for pneumonia describe the way the inflammatory cells infiltrate the lung tissue or the appearance of the affected tissue (see the following examples).

  • Bronchopneumonia causes scattered, patchy infiltrates of inflammation in the air sacs throughout the lungs. It is more diffuse than lobar pneumonia.
  • Lobar pneumonia causes an inflammation of one lobe of a lung and typically involves all the airspaces in a single lobe.
  • Lipoid pneumonia is characterized by the accumulation of fats within the airspaces. It can be caused by aspiration of oils or associated with airway obstruction.

What Is the Staging for Pneumonia?

A type of pneumonia, called lobar pneumonia, has 4 stages of development and resolution which include:

  • In the first stage, which occurs within 24 hours of infection, the lung has increased blood flow and swelling to the airways, but only a few bacteria or white blood cells to fight infection are present.
  • The second stage (day 2-3), is characterized by white and red blood cells and damaged cellular debris clogging the airways and air-sacs (alveoli) and an increase in bacteria.
  • In the third stage (day 4-6), the lung has accumulation of more damaged red blood cells and an increase in fibrin as the debris thins out and becomes more fluid-like (exudative).
  • The fourth and final stage, called resolution (day 7-10), is characterized by resorption of inflammatory fluids and cellular debris and restoration of the normal airways and air-sacs. Residual inflammation may lead to chronic narrowing of airways and scar tissue (pleural adhesions).

How Do You Prevent Pneumonia?

Patients can reduce their risk of getting pneumonia in some cases.

  • Get vaccinated
  • Wash hands frequently with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds

Get an annual flu shot. Flu is a common cause of pneumonia.

Children under age 5, adults 65 and older, and patients at increased risk of pneumococcal disease due to other health conditions should get pneumococcal pneumonia vaccine, a common form of bacterial pneumonia

In children: Hib vaccine, which prevents pneumonia in children from Haemophilus influenza type b

Other vaccines that can prevent infections by bacteria and viruses that may lead to pneumonia, including pertussis (whooping cough), chicken pox, and measles. Wash Your Hands

  • Wash hands frequently with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds
  • Don’t smoke
  • Eat a healthy diet, exercise regularly, and get adequate sleep to stay healthy
  • Synagis (palivizumab) may be given to some children younger than 24 months to prevent pneumonia caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)
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What Is Prostate?

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The prostate gland (the prostate) is an organ of the male reproductive system. It is about the size of a walnut and is found at the base of the bladder. The thin tube that allows urine and semen to pass out of the penis (the urethra) runs through the prostate gland. Alkaline fluid produced by the prostate gland helps to nourish sperm and leaves the urethra as ejaculate (semen). The prostate undergoes two main growth spurts. The first is fuelled by the sex hormones made by the testes during puberty. This prompts the prostate to reach an average weight of 20 grams. The second growth spurt begins when men are in their thirties.

Common Problems

Here are some examples of non-cancer prostate problems:

Benign prostatic hyperplasia, or BPH, is very common in older men. It means your prostate is enlarged but not cancerous. Treatments for BPH include:

Watchful waiting also called active surveillance. If your symptoms are not too bad, your doctor may tell you to wait to see if they get worse before starting treatment. Your doctor will tell you how often to return for check-ups.

Medications. Medicines can help shrink the prostate or relax muscles near your prostate to ease symptoms.

Surgery. If nothing else has worked, your doctor may suggest surgery to help urine flow.

Other treatments. Sometimes radio waves, microwaves, or lasers are used to treat urinary problems caused by BPH. These methods use different kinds of heat to reduce extra prostate tissue.

Acute bacterial prostatitis usually starts suddenly from a bacterial infection. See your doctor right away if you have fever, chills, or pain in addition to prostate symptoms. Most cases can be cured with antibiotics. You also may need medication to help with pain or discomfort.

Chronic bacterial prostatitis is an infection that comes back again and again. This rare problem can be hard to treat. Sometimes, taking antibiotics for a long time may work. Talk with your doctor about other things you can do to help you feel better.

Chronic prostatitis, also called chronic pelvic pain syndrome, is a common prostate problem. It can cause pain in the lower back, in the groin, or at the tip of the penis. Treatment may require a combination of medicines, surgery, and lifestyle changes.

Be sure to talk with your doctor about the possible side effects of treatment.

The three most common types of prostate disease are:

  • Benign prostatic hyperplasia
  • Prostatitis
  • Prostate cancer

Symptoms of Prostate Problems

See your doctor right away if you have any of these symptoms:

  • Frequent urge to urinate
  • Need to get up many times during the night to urinate
  • Blood in urine or semen
  • Pain or burning urination
  • Painful ejaculation
  • Frequent pain or stiffness in lower back, hips, pelvic or rectal area, or upper thighs
  • Dribbling of urine

Diagnosis of prostate disease

Prostate disease is diagnosed using a variety of tests, including:

  • physical examination, including digital rectal examination (DRE), where the doctor inserts a gloved finger into your rectum to check the size of your prostate
  • blood test for prostate specific antigen (PSA test; discuss this with your doctor)
  • mid-stream urine (MSU) tests to look for infection or blood in the urine
  • ultrasound scans and urinary flow studies
  • biopsies of the prostate.
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Ways to Control Child’s Anger: Teach Your Child Anger Management

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If you’re a parent, it is a certainty that you have had to deal with an angry child. Often, we end up in shouting matches with our kids, or we freeze up, not knowing what to do when an angry outburst occurs.

Anger is a normal emotion in kids and adults alike. But how we express and deal with our feelings of anger is the difference between living in relative peace and feeling like we are at our wits’ end

Don’t Yell at or Challenge Your Child During an Angry Outburst

Many times parents deal with angry outbursts by challenging their kids and yelling back. But this will just increase your feeling of being out of control. The best thing you can do is remain calm in a crisis.

 Work on communication skills

Don’t jump to conclusions. Learn to express what you want appropriately. Stop and listen to what others are saying. Learn active listening skills (mirroring ensures you are hearing others correctly) and think before speaking. Avoid the temptation to get defensive. Ask questions so you know what others are trying to say. Avoid name calling. Keep cool.

Talk about the source of the anger. In children, frustration and disappointment often bring on angry outbursts. Look for the underlying concern. The source may be a skill not mastered or a difficulty in school.

Pay Attention to Your Reactions

It’s important to watch your reactions, both physical and mental. Your senses will tell you “Yikes, I’m in the presence of somebody who is very upset.” You’ll feel your heart start beating faster because your adrenaline will be heightened. Even though it’s difficult, the trick is to act against that in some way and try to stay calm.

Encourage empathy

Encourage your child to see things from another point of view. Even young children can understand when someone else feels sad or angry. If they don’t want to talk about their feelings, try inserting a favorite character from a book into the story. Ask questions to prompt your child to see another side of the issue and relate it to the situation at hand. How would the characters feel and react?

Remind them to forgive themselves and others. Even good people sometimes behave badly. Losing your temper once doesn’t mean you can’t change. Children especially need to believe that they will not be forever judged for their actions.

Be generous with hugs and praise

Physical contact can help defuse a challenging situation. A well-timed hug can ward off feelings of jealousy or frustration that can lead to anger. A gentle touch on an arm can help calm escalating nerves.

Remember to praise your child for their attempts, not just their achievements. Sometimes people fail, and there is much to be learned when things go wrong. Remind your kids of their strengths and what they have accomplished thus far. Pointing out your own failures can help your children see that they can move forward and try again.

Be a good role model

Be aware of your own anger. Studies show that parental emotions influence their children. If you think you don’t exhibit anger often, pay attention to how many times you yell or otherwise show anger (maybe keep a journal), noting what triggers it and how you react (yelling, punching the wall, hitting the steering wheel).

While anger is a normal part of life, it is sometimes indicative of a more serious issue. When anger falls outside developmental norms—for example, if a teacher reports your child’s anger is out of control, or if it’s impacting your child’s and possibly your family’s life—it is time to seek help.

Several developmental and mental health issues can contribute to emotional outbursts. A professional evaluation can help diagnose and find the proper approach for your child.

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What is Aspiration Pneumonia?

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Aspiration pneumonia is a type of pneumonia that might occur if a person breathes something in instead of swallowing it. The germs from food particles, saliva, vomit, or other substances may infect the airways and lead to aspiration pneumonia.

You can also aspirate food that travels back up from your stomach to your esophagus.

All of these things may carry bacteria that affect your lungs. Healthy lungs can clear up on their own. If they don’t, pneumonia can develop as a complication

Sometimes, there’s no clear sign that food or liquid is going down the wrong way. Because you don’t notice it, you don’t cough. But in most cases, you:

Feel something stuck in your throat

  • Hurt when you swallow, or it’s hard to do
  • Cough while or after you eat or drink
  • Feel congested after you eat or drink
  • Have a gurgling or “wet-sounding” voice when you eat

Other signs are:

  • Too much saliva in your mouth
  • Chest discomfort or heartburn
  • Shortness of breath or fatigue while eating
  • Fever within a half-hour of eating
  • Frequent pneumonia
  • Trouble chewing

What causes aspiration pneumonia?

Pneumonia from aspiration can occur when your defenses are impaired and the aspirated contents have a large amount of harmful bacteria.

You can aspirate and develop pneumonia if your food or drink “goes down the wrong way.” This may happen even if you can swallow normally and have a regular gag reflex. In that case, most of the time you’ll be able to prevent this by coughing. Those who have impaired coughing ability, however, may not be able to. This impairment may be due to:

  • neurological disorders
  • throat cancer
  • medical conditions like myasthenia gravis or Parkinson’s disease
  • excessive use of alcohol or prescription or illegal drugs
  • use of sedatives or anesthesia
  • a weakened immune system
  • esophageal disorders
  • dental problems that interfere with chewing or swallowing

Aspiration Diagnosis

Your doctor will ask about your symptoms and do a physical exam. They might look closely at your mouth and cheeks. They may also recommend that you see a specialist called a speech-language pathologist, who can check for problems with your swallowing muscles.

You might have tests such as:

X-rays. These can give your doctor an image of how much material you’ve breathed in.

Bronchoscopy. Your doctor gives you medicine to relax and puts a thin tube called a bronchoscope down your throat. It has a tiny camera to take images of the insides of your lungs.

Modified barium swallow (MBS). A technician takes X-rays of your throat and esophagus while you swallow foods and liquids that have been mixed with a chemical called barium.

Fiber-optic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES). A specialist numbs your nose. They put a thin, flexible tube called an endoscope through it and into your throat. A camera inside it takes pictures while you swallow saliva, food, and liquids.

Pharyngeal manometry. With your nose numbed, a technician puts a tube called a catheter through it and into your throat. The catheter has sensors to measure the pressure in your throat and esophagus when you swallow.

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What is Pneumonia?

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Pneumonia is an infection in one or both lungs. Bacteria, viruses, and fungi cause it.

The infection causes inflammation in the air sacs in your lungs, which are called alveoli. The alveoli fill with fluid or pus, making it difficult to breathe.

Symptoms of Pneumonia

Your symptoms can vary depending on what’s causing your pneumonia, your age, and your overall health. They usually develop over several days.

Common pneumonia symptoms include:

  • Chest pain when you breathe or cough
  • Cough that produces phlegm or mucus
  • Fatigue and loss of appetite
  • Fever, sweating, and chills
  • Nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea
  • Shortness of breath

Newborns and infants may not show any signs of infection. Or they might vomit, have a fever and a cough, and seem restless or tired.

When to see a doctor

See your doctor if you have difficulty breathing, chest pain, persistent fever of 102 F (39 C) or higher, or persistent cough, especially if you’re coughing up pus.

It’s especially important that people in these high-risk groups see a doctor:

  • Adults older than age 65
  • Children younger than age 2 with signs and symptoms
  • People with an underlying health condition or weakened immune system
  • People receiving chemotherapy or taking medication that suppresses the immune system

For some older adults and people with heart failure or chronic lung problems, pneumonia can quickly become a life-threatening condition.

Causes of pneumonia

Bacteria, viruses, or fungi can cause pneumonia.

Common causes include:

  • Flu viruses
  • Cold viruses
  • RSV virus (the top cause of pneumonia in babies age 1 or younger)
  • Bacteria called Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae

Some people who are in the hospital get “ventilator-associated pneumonia” if they got the infection while using a ventilator, a machine that helps you breathe.

If you get pneumonia while you’re in a hospital and aren’t on a ventilator, that’s called “hospital-acquired” pneumonia. But most people get “community-acquired pneumonia,” which means they didn’t get it in a hospital.

Pneumonia Treatment

Your doctor can tell you which treatment is right for you.

If you have bacterial pneumonia, you’ll get antibiotics. Make sure you take all of the medicine your doctor gives you, even if you start to feel better before you’re through with it.

If you have viral pneumonia, antibiotics won’t help. You’ll need to rest, drink a lot of fluids, and take medicine for your fever.

If your symptoms are severe or if you have other conditions that make you more likely to have complications, your doctor may send you to the hospital.

With any kind of pneumonia, recovery will take time. You’re going to need lots of rest. You might need a week off your usual routines, and you could still feel tired for a month.

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What is Perimenopause?

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Perimenopause, or menopause transition, begins several years before menopause. It’s the time when the ovaries gradually begin to make less estrogen. It usually starts in a woman’s 40s, but can start in her 30s or even earlier.

Perimenopause lasts up until menopause, the point when the ovaries stop releasing eggs. In the last 1 to 2 years of perimenopause, this drop in estrogen speeds up. At this stage, many women have menopause symptoms.

Perimenopause occurs during the 40s for most women, but some notice changes as early as their mid-30s. As estrogen hormones rise and fall, periods grow longer or shorter and women experience menopause-like symptoms. Perimenopause is a natural part of the aging process, although some medications, cancer treatments and ovary surgery can speed up the process or cause menopause sooner.

What Are The Stages Leading Up To Menopause?

After puberty, there are three other phases of female fertility:

  • Pre-menopause: Women have full ovarian function, regularly produce estrogen and ovulate.
  • Perimenopause: The ovaries begin to fluctuate in their ovulation and production of estrogen, which can result in unpredictable menstrual cycles and symptoms.

Menopause: When the ovaries have shut down. Someone would be in menopause after 12 months without menses.

What Are The Symptoms Of Perimenopause?

During perimenopause, you can experience a variety of symptoms. The reason: Your ovaries have been making estrogen since your first period. During perimenopause, the estrogen production decreases substantially. Your body has to adjust to functioning with less of the hormone, putting you into estrogen withdrawals. The type and intensity of symptoms vary greatly among women – some just feel a little off or don’t notice anything at all.

Symptoms of perimenopause may include:

  • irregular periods
  • periods that are heavier or lighter than normal
  • worse premenstrual syndrome (PMS) before periods
  • breast tenderness
  • weight gain
  • hair changes
  • heart palpitations
  • headaches
  • loss of sex drive
  • concentration difficulties
  • forgetfulness
  • muscle aches
  • urinary tract infections (UTIs)
  • fertility issues in women who are trying to conceive

About 80 percent of women will experience some form of a hot flash during perimenopause or menopause. Hot flashes happen when your brain has trouble regulating your internal temperature, which is a common response to having less estrogen. The shift in temperature may not be noticeable. Or, it may feel like someone cranked up the thermostat on your core body temperature. You suddenly feel uncomfortably hot and sweaty, or you may wake up drenched in sweat (called night sweats).

When to call a doctor

You don’t necessarily have to call your doctor to obtain a perimenopause or menopause diagnosis, but there are instances when you should definitely see your OB-GYN.

Call right away if you experience:

  • spotting after your period
  • blood clots during your period
  • bleeding after sex
  • periods that are much longer or much shorter than normal

Some possible explanations are hormonal imbalances or fibroids, both of which are treatable. However, you also want to rule out the possibility of cancer.

You should also call your doctor if the symptoms of either perimenopause or menopause become severe enough to interfere with your daily life.

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What is Creatinine?

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Creatinine is a waste product of creatine, which is a chemical that the body uses to supply the muscles with energy. Creatinine is formed as a result of the natural breakdown of your muscle tissue and can then enter the blood.

Under normal conditions, your kidneys filter creatinine from your blood. Creatinine leaves the body through urine.

Normal and high ranges

Creatinine levels can be determined using a blood test or a urine test.

Blood creatinine test

You may also see this test referred to as a serum creatinine test. During this test, blood is collected from a vein in your arm and is then sent to a lab for further analysis.

Urine creatinine test

Your doctor may collect a random (single) urine sample for this test, but they’ll more likely request a 24-hour sample. A 24-hour urine sample involves collecting your urine over a period of 24 hours.

What your high results could mean?

Generally speaking, high levels of creatinine can indicate that your kidneys aren’t working well.

There are many possible causes of high creatinine, some of which may be a one-time occurrence. Examples can include things such as dehydration or intake of large amounts of protein or the supplement creatine. All of these can be temporarily hard on your kidneys.

However, other causes of high creatinine may point to a health condition. Many of these conditions can cause damage or disease that impacts kidney function. They can include:

  • drug toxicity (drug-induced nephrotoxicity)
  • kidney infection (pyelonephritis)
  • glomerulonephritis
  • diabetes
  • high blood pressure
  • heart disease, such as atherosclerosis or congestive heart failure
  • blockage of the urinary tract
  • kidney failure, both acute and chronic

High Creatinine Symptoms

The disturbing symptoms of high creatinine in blood include:

  • Swelling or edema
  • Shortness of breath
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Changes in urination
  • Dehydration
  • Muscle cramps and chest pains
  • Fatigue
  • High blood pressure
  • Confusion

Diet tips to lower creatinine levels

A person may be able to reduce their creatinine levels by making some of the following changes to their diet.

  • Reducing protein intake
  • Increasing dietary fiber intake
  • Avoiding dehydration
  • Supplement and medication use

Lifestyle tips

People who exercise strenuously and have a risk of kidney disease may benefit from checking with a doctor about whether their exercise routine is safe.

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What is Varicocele?

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A varicocele (VAR-ih-koe-seel) is an enlargement of the veins within the loose bag of skin that holds your testicles (scrotum). A varicocele is similar to a varicose vein you might see in your leg.

Varicoceles are a common cause of low sperm production and decreased sperm quality, which can cause infertility. However, not all varicoceles affect sperm production. Varicoceles can also cause testicles to fail to develop normally or shrink.

Symptoms

A varicocele often produces no signs or symptoms. Rarely, it might cause pain. The pain may:

  • Vary from sharp to dull discomfort
  • Increase with standing or physical exertion, especially over long periods
  • Worsen over the course of a day
  • Be relieved when you lie on your back
  • Impaired fertility

With time, varicoceles might enlarge and become more noticeable. A varicocele has been described as looking like a “bag of worms.” The condition might cause a swollen testicle, almost always on the left side.

What causes a varicocele to develop?

A spermatic cord holds up each testicle. The cords also contain the veins, arteries, and nerves that support these glands. In healthy veins inside the scrotum, one-way valves move the blood from the testicles to the scrotum, and then they send it back to the heart.

Sometimes the blood doesn’t move through the veins like it should and begins to pool in the vein, causing it to enlarge. A varicocele develops slowly over time.

There are no established risk factors for developing a varicocele, and the exact cause is unclear.

Treatment for varicoceles

It’s not always necessary to treat a varicocele. However, you may want to consider treatment if the varicocele:

  • causes pain
  • causes testicular atrophy
  • causes infertility

Surgery Options include

  • Varicocelectomy
  • Varicocele embolization

Surgery is only necessary if the varicocele is causing you pain or if you’re trying to have a child. Talk to your doctor about which treatment is right for you.

When to see a doctor

Because a varicocele usually causes no symptoms, it often requires no treatment. Varicoceles might be discovered during a fertility evaluation or a routine physical exam.

However, if you experience pain or swelling in your scrotum, discover a mass on your scrotum, notice that your testicles are different sizes, or develop a varicocele in your youth, or you’re having problems with fertility, contact your doctor. A number of conditions can cause a scrotal mass or testicular pain, some of which require immediate treatment.

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What is Stomach Ulcer?

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Stomach ulcers are sores in the lining of the stomach or small intestine. They occur when the protective mucus that lines the stomach becomes ineffective.

The stomach produces a strong acid to help digest food and protect against microbes. To protect the tissues of the body from this acid, it also secretes a thick layer of mucus

Symptoms of Stomach Ulcer

The classic symptom of a stomach ulcer is indigestion, also called dyspepsia.

Indigestion causes pain or discomfort in the stomach area. This symptom can be mistaken for heartburn, which can occur at the same time.

Heartburn can be caused by acid reflux or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It occurs slightly higher up from the stomach and is felt in the lower part of the chest.

It is worth noting that not all stomach ulcers cause indigestion.

Stomach ulcer symptoms tend to be more distinct than heartburn, but symptoms can still be vague.

An ulcer tends to produce a burning or dull pain in the stomach area. This pain is sometimes described as a “biting” or “gnawing” pain. Some people may describe a hungry sensation.

Other symptoms include:

  • weight loss
  • nausea and vomiting
  • not eating because of pain
  • burping
  • bloating
  • pain may be relieved by eating, drinking, or taking antacids

Some stomach ulcers go unnoticed and show no typical indigestion-type pains. These ulcers are less common and tend to be diagnosed after the ulcer has started bleeding. Some ulcers can cause a hole in the stomach wall. This is known as perforation and is a serious condition.

Stomach ulcer symptoms often change over time and can be difficult to spot.

What causes stomach ulcers?

Stomach ulcers are almost always caused by one of the following:

  • an infection with the bacterium Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)
  • long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen

Treating stomach ulcers

Treatment will vary depending on the cause of your ulcer. Most ulcers can be treated with a prescription from your doctor, but in rare cases, surgery may be required.

It’s important to promptly treat an ulcer. Talk to your doctor to discuss a treatment plan. If you have an actively bleeding ulcer, you’ll likely be hospitalized for intensive treatment with endoscopy and IV ulcer medications.

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